Ban 3D Printed Guns: Arnold for Stop Handgun Violence

We had to strike the right balance, as we didn’t want the piece to be too graphic, nor did we want to be soft in our approach.

 

Lucas Casão
Creative Director Arnold

Gui Racz
Creative Director Arnold
Dan Hlivka
Art Director Arnold

Arnold
Publicidade/serviço completo/integração
Boston, Estados Unidos
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Tell us about your role in the creation of this work? 

It was a team effort to bring this idea to life. We did the best we could to develop the piece in a way that would truly impact the audience.

 

Give us an overview of the campaign, what is it about?

3D printed guns are easy to make and almost impossible to stop. More than 100,000 Americans have downloaded plans to print 3D weapons. 3D gun files can be easily downloaded and printed by anyone, creating untraceable firearms. In most States, this is completely legal. In order to ban 3D printed guns, we created a video showing the danger of it that redirects people to a microsite where they can contact their congressman or congresswoman to drive forward national legislative action.

 

 Tell us about the details creative brief, what did it ask?

The brief was very simple: engage people and make it easier for them to contact their congressman or congresswoman to encourage them to act against the proliferation of 3D printed guns.

Which insight led to the creation of this piece of work?

It seems that every week you hear about a new tragedy that involves gun violence. With 3D printing technologies rapidly improving and 3D gun files readily available, it’s only a matter of time before someone commits an unimaginable act with a weapon they printed at home. This campaign was created to warn people who may not be aware that this is a very real problem that we need to deal with before it’s too late.

 

 Can you share with us any alternative ideas (if any) for this campaign? Why was this idea chosen?  

We decided to move forward with this idea because it felt like the right approach for a current problem. Unfortunately, the timing always seems to be right because every time we turn around, there is news of another mass shooting.

 

How did the client initially react to this idea?

Our client loved the idea and was very supportive on the execution of it. We were fully aware of the possibility of receiving some backlash from those against gun control – which did happen – but we knew we had to use our platform and resources to speak up about a very important issue.

 

What was the greatest challenge that you and your team faced during development?

The greatest challenge by far was to be sensitive and respectful with the scene we were depicting. We had to strike the right balance, as we didn’t want the piece to be too graphic, nor  did we want to be soft in our approach. It was critical to illustrate the terror in witnessing a shooting and to provoke the audience to feel it as well. Starting the film with a very minimalist style helped us find the balance we needed. We started by showing only a few characters and working on their facial expressions to the point you could see the terror of what was happening through their eyes and body language.

 

What did you enjoy most about seeing this campaign through? Did you learn anything new from the experience?

We wouldn’t use the word enjoy. We would say it is rewarding to know we are doing the right thing. We are using our talent to give back to the community. The more agencies that help to solve community problems, the better. It’s encouraging to see that Twitter has prohibited 3D printed gun sharing and that legislation in Massachusetts, New York and Connecticut has been created since we started this campaign.

 

Where do you see this campaign going in the future?

We’re taking it one step at a time. Ideally, we would like to draw in as many viewers as possible and encourage them to act against the proliferation of 3D printed weapons. Then, once 3D printed guns are banned, we would move onto the next problem, a bigger problem, which is to engage people to take action on gun control.

 

 

 

 

 

Lucas Casão
Creative Director Arnold
Gui Racz
Creative Director Arnold
Dan Hlivka
Art Director Arnold